Poor GCSEs increase self-harm risk

Poor GCSEs increase self-harm risk, warns Prince’s Trust

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/25642662

 

People with fewer than five A to C GCSEs are more likely to self-harm than students with good results, a charity is warning.

The Prince’s Trust surveyed 2,161, 16 to 25-year-olds and one in five said they did things like cut or burn themselves.

For people with poor GCSE results, that jumped to nearly one in three.

Stacy Hawkins, 22, said her mental health problems started when she moved to a new school in Cornwall aged 15.

“I was bullied,” she said. “I didn’t fit in.

“I’d be pushed, shoved, tripped up in the corridor and I couldn’t really concentrate because I was thinking more about what was going to happen once I’d left class knowing I’d probably be beaten up again.”

In the end Stacy didn’t get any GCSEs at grade A to C.

That meant she was unable to go to college, which is one of the reasons she says she ended up leaving home at 17.

It was shortly after that when she started self-harming.

“I’d cut myself,” she revealed. “I’d burn myself, I’d try and break my bones. I’d take large overdoses.

“I don’t really know why I did it. It just made me feel better. It helped me release some of that anger and that if the world was hurting me why shouldn’t I hurt myself?

“It seemed as though life really wasn’t worth living.”

Paul Brown works for The Prince’s Trust and says people like Stacy need more help from the government, charities and the private sector.

“We believe more needs to be done in school, with schools working together with organisations like The Prince’s Trust, to provide specialist support to those young people who need help to overcome the issues in their lives,” he said.

“We need to redouble our efforts and make sure we focus on the most vulnerable young people.

“That includes those who’ve left school with fewer than five good GCSEs because we know they’re more likely to suffer a whole range of mental health issues.”

One person the charity has already helped is Stacy.

“I’m in a lot better place now, I rarely self-harm,” she said.

“I feel more confident about talking to people about how I feel.

“I’ve gone back to college to try and better my English GCSE and I’m generally feeling a lot better in myself.”

 

 

Facts about suicide in the UK

  • Suicide is the biggest single killer of under-35s in the UK
  • Nearly four people aged between 15 and 34 kill themselves every day
  • Three times as many men as women kill themselves in the UK

Source: Office of National Statistics

Self-Harm in young on the rise says charity

An increasing number of young people in the UK are choosing to deliberately hurt themselves. This is according to children’s charities ChildLine, YouthNet and YoungMinds, as well as the webiste Selfharm.co.uk, which came together to raise awareness of the issue for Self-harm Awareness Day (1 March), BBC News reports.

The groups explained that not only are more teenagers self-harming, but that younger children are beginning to be affected by the issue.

It is hoped that by joining forces, the charities can reduce the stigma attached to self-harm and to dispel some of the myths that surround it.

The groups warned that children as young as ten have called helplines to say they have purposefully injured themselves, while around one in ten young people are believed to have hurt themselves at one point or another.

Paediatrician and television presenter Dr Ranj Singh said: “The problem is related to emotional distress and anguish and feelings of anxiety, pain and depression. A lot of that can be due to increasing societal pressure as a whole.”

 

http://www.bps.org.uk/news/self-harm-young-rise

Bleeding royalty

As a kid, after having a blood test, I was told I had a low platelet count. At the time in History class we were learning about the Tsar of Russia whose son was born with Hemophilia, I was convinced I had it too. The symptoms are similar, though I have to say mine weren’t quite as deadly or dramatic.

Hemophilia: is a group of hereditary genetic disorders that impair the body’s ability to control blood clotting or coagulation, which is used to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is broken. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemophilia)

I appeared to have the watered down version (from what i understand.. but then I’m no Dr). If the number of platelets is too low, excessive bleeding can occur.

I’ve always had this problem, I get a small cut and it takes 20 mins or more to clot, it’s never bothered me, it’s been more a challenge of what shapes I can make with the blood… yes sickening but tru!

Later, once I’d done a First Aid Course and learnt that you had to wrap a wound and not change the dressing to encourage clotting I tried doing that, but adding dressing after dressing on to a finger is stifling and yes.. my fingers did look big in them!

In any case, when I found out, I was so happy, the Tsar’s son had a low life expectancy, and though it wasn’t wat eventually killed him, I had hope it would be the death of me. Unfortunately 17 years after this diagnosis and still with a low platelet count, I’m STILL here… BBBOOOOOOOO

and as I’m not royalty I don’t think I have sufficient enemies who’ll have me killed in my sleep.

If you’d like to brush up on your knowledge of history and read about the Tsar’s son: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexei_Nikolaevich,_Tsarevich_of_Russia